Blog Archives

Phenology update: Garlic Mustard

100_3393Garlic mustard – Alliaria petiolata; Basal rosettes have normally grown enough to be easily spotted now.  The garlic mustard in this photo is particularly robust.  Also notice the Johnson grass in the background, and ground ivy in the front.

Phenology updates: Deptford pink, Japanese barberry, garlic mustard, purple loosestrife, Queen Anne’s lace, mimosa, Chinese yam, and orange daylily

Hey AOWCP blog followers.  Uploading photos with updates of plant phenology has been one of my favorite things to post.  Unfortunately,  the main computer I am using doesn’t like loading pictures very well.  I will try harder to get to a different computer to keep loading pictures up.  Here are some highlights from the last month.

DSC_0568

Deptford pink – Dianthus armeria : flowering

DSC_0561

Japanese barberry – Berberis thunbergii : we used our weed wrench to pulled this guy up at a workshop

DSC_0559

Garlic mustard – Alliaria petiolata : here are some garlic mustard basal rosettes (intermixed with some japanese stiltgrass – Microstegium vimineum).

DSC_0545

Purple loosestrife – Lythrum salicaria : Blooming along the Ohio River.  Purple loosestrife blooms from early July to early September

DSC_0543

Queen Anne’s lace – Daucus carota: Queen Anne sure does own a lot of lace around here.  Here is some flowering (white flowers) intermixed with some dried curly dock (Rumex cripsus).

  DSC_0595

Mimosa – Albizia julibrissin : Most have finished flowering by now, you may find a couple more still flowering the further north you are

DSC_0587

Chinese yam – Dioscorea opposita: agressively growing, should have tiny bulbils (think of a tiny potato aboveground) forming at axis.

   DSC_0573

Orange daylilies – Hemerocallis fulva : Still flowering

Garlic Mustard control on the Vinton Experiemental Forest

These past few weeks the AOWCP has been working with OSU-Extension and the USFS Northern Research Station to control garlic mustard at the Vinton Experimental Forest.

DSC_0396

This garlic mustard has already been sprayed and has noticeable signs of stress.  Most plants will take several days to weeks to finally die.

This time of year is also a great time to spray garlic mustard seedlings that germinated this spring.

DSC_0403

Garlic mustard: Salad days for an invasive plant

Washington Post article about garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata):

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/special/metro/urban-jungle/pages/130416.html

Invasive Phenology update- garlic mustard and stinking pennycress

Looks like Garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) as begun to bolt and has some developed buds.

100_3066

100_3068

Stinking pennycress (Thlapsi alliaceum) is flowering and seeding alongside roadways and open areas

100_3070 100_3071

Webcast: Garlic Mustard and the 2013 Challenge

Join us for the FREE Stewardship Network Webcast Wednesday, April 10th, “Garlic Mustard and the 2013 Challenge”

Presentation by: Abby Gartland, Grand Traverse Regional Land Conservancy; Heather Huffstutler, Six Rivers Regional Land Conservancy; Joan Meyer, Kent ISD and volunteer at Aman Park; and Lisa Brush, The Stewardship Network

Date: Wednesday, April 10th, 2013
Time: 12 noon to 1pm Eastern
Place: Your Computer!

Click here to view webcast!
(Link will become live day of webcast)

Spring finally feels like it’s on its way – the weather is warming up, the songbirds are back, and the garlic mustard is showing its green little leaves. On April 10th, we’ll be kicking off our 2013 Garlic Mustard Challenge with this webcast. We’ll cover a bit of the science behind the plant, and then we’ll be joined by people leading the charge against this invasive in different places around Michigan! We’ll hear about their work and success protecting the special places where they live. Tune in, and get pumped up for the 2013 Challenge!

____________________________________________

Abby Gartland – Abby joined the Stewardship Staff in 2001 following the completion of her B.S. in Fisheries and Wildlife from Michigan State University. She spends much of her personal and work time tromping in the woods learning about and enjoying the unique flora and fauna of NW Lower Michigan. Although Abby envisions Michigan as her home base she hopes to travel extensively, double her life list (at least!) and experience as much of the natural world as she can. With the support of the Stewardship Team, Abby is responsible for much of the biological work at GTRLC’s nature preserves including completing baseline inventories of the flora and fauna on site; she also manages the invasive species program.

Heather Huffstutler – Heather has a B.S. in Biology from Eastern Michigan University and holds a secondary education teaching certificate. Her career in conservation began as a volunteer in Northern Michigan for The Nature Conservancy and she’s been hooked ever since. She has worked all over the country, landing back home in Michigan 6 years ago. As Stewardship Director at Six Rivers Regional Land Conservancy, Heather oversees all aspects of the Conservancy’s Stewardship Program, including planning for ecosystem restoration, writing management plans, managing grant projects, and leading the Conservancy’s strategic conservation planning efforts. She facilitates the Stewardship Network Headwaters Cluster and it’s current work to engage landowners in battling swallowwort in northwestern Oakland County.

Joan Meyer – Mary Jane Dockery was instrumental in starting Blandford Nature Center in Grand Rapids. About 20 years ago she led a wildflower walk through Aman Park and casually pointed out some garlic mustard growing alongside the trail. She mentioned that in about 10 years there would no longer be wild flowers there but garlic mustard instead. At that time I remember thinking and saying “Not while there is breath in my body!” So, I began. My friend and I walked our dogs through the park every day and began pulling the garlic mustard. Those little walks morphed into Garlic Mustard Pulls involving Master Gardeners, Master Naturalists, volunteers, friends, neighbors, Audubon Society members, Grand Rapids Parks Department and anyone willing to spend some time. I placed descriptive signs throughout the park with pictures of garlic mustard, a little about the nastiness of the invasive weed and encouraged people to pull. It’s fun to walk through and find garbage bags of the stuff along the trails and know that people are helping. My husband is assigned the job of taking our wheelbarrow through the park and collecting the bags for counting and disposal. The GR Parks Department (though the park is in Ottawa County, it is owned by the GR Parks Department) picks up the bags and takes them to the incinerator. When I talk to people I encourage them to designate one small area of the park “theirs.” It is then their responsibility to return year after year to make sure their spot stays garlic mustard free. How very, very encouraging to find areas that were filled with the weed, now garlic mustard free and producing all manner of Michigan wild flowers. Aman Park has been identified as the park in Michigan with the most diversity and quantity of wild flowers and I am so proud of her! Jacob Aman, who donated the park to us in 1926, is buried there and I talk to him frequently, thanking him for donating the park to “the recipients of his bounty” and promising him we will continue the fight against garlic mustard!

Lisa Brush – Executive Director, The Stewardship Network. Lisa has worked in the environmental field in Michigan for the last fifteen years. She is currently the Executive Director of the Stewardship Network and has been involved with the Network since its inception more than 10 years ago. She has a wealth of experience helping non-scientific people understand scientific issues. For over nine years, as she has built and coordinated The Stewardship Network, she has emphasized effective and meaningful stakeholder involvement in developing and implementing all aspects of this program. She has a M.S. in Natural Resources from the University of Michigan and a B.A. (Science in Society) from Wesleyan University.

Garlic Mustard pulls scheduled around Athens

Organized by the Athens Forest Stewardship Club in collaboration with the Athens Conservancy, Athens Trails, Friends of Strouds Run State Park and Rural Action.

 As in past years, volunteers will remove garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) from Strouds Run State Park, City-owned preserve land, Athens Conservancy preserves, and along the Hocking-Adena Bikeway. Doing so will help protect our native flora from this troublesome invasive weed. Garlic mustard reproduces prolifically, displacing the diverse wildflowers and ferns that were there before the mustard invaded. Garlic mustard also suppresses the fungal partners (called mycorrhizae) in the root system of most trees and many other plants, which the plants depend on to help absorb enough water and minerals from the soil. New research indicates that the overabundance of white-tailed deer is contributing to the spread of garlic mustard by eating many of the competing native plants. Deer find garlic mustard distasteful and seldom eat it.

 Everyone is welcome to participate in any of the events, whether or not you are affiliated with the sponsoring organizations. Except for the March 17 and 24 work sessions, you do not need to notify anyone in advance to participate, but a contact person is listed below for each event in case you have questions. In general, heavy rain will cancel outings but a light drizzle will not.

 Children are welcome at most of the work sessions, but caution is needed in Blue Ash Valley and the Bluebell Preserve because the mustard in these areas is intermixed with lots of wildflowers, which are easily trampled. Children with a gentle temperament will do fine even at these sites, but rambunctious kids may do more damage than good.

 What to bring: drinking water, sun protection, sturdy footwear, garden gloves (optional, but recommended if you are allergic to poison-ivy). No tools are needed; the mustard plants pull out easily. For protection against poison-ivy and thorns, socks and long pants are strongly recommended.

 Between April 22 and May 19, anyone working in the woods should wear a bright orange vest or cap because it is turkey hunting season. Turkey hunting is permitted only in the morning between April 22 and May 5. From May 6 through May 19, it is permitted all day. Turkey hunting is permitted at Strouds Run State Park but not in the other areas where mustard pulling is scheduled.

 In addition to the weekend outings on this list, there will be a few work sessions on weekdays, probably scheduled only a few days in advance based on the weather forecast. These will be announced via the listservs of the sponsoring organizations, but anyone who is not on one of these listservs and would like to be alerted when a weekday work session is scheduled, please contact Phil Cantino (pcantino@gmail.edu).

 Saturday, March 16, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: along Sundown Trail in the first valley east of Dow Lake dam
Meeting place: Dow Lake dam parking area, off US-50
Contact: Melanie Schori (schori@ohio.edu; 594-6796)
 
 Sunday, March 17, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Athens Conservancy’s Bluebell Preserve (western part)
Meeting place: to be announced
Contact: Phil Cantino (pcantino@gmail.com; 594-3338)
[Please contact Phil in advance to participate in this session.]
 
 Saturday, March 23, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: along Sundown Trail in the first valley east of Dow Lake dam
Meeting place: Dow Lake dam parking area, off US-50
Contact: Phil Cantino (pcantino@gmail.com; 594-3338)
 
 Sunday, March 24, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Athens Conservancy’s Bluebell Preserve (eastern part)
Meeting place: to be announced
Contact: Phil Cantino (pcantino@gmail.com; 594-3338)
[Please contact Phil in advance to participate in this session.]
 
Saturday, March 30, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Blue Ash Valley in Strouds Run State Park
Meeting place: parking lot behind Hampton Inn, next to University Mall
Contact: Phil Cantino (pcantino@gmail.com; 594-3338)
 
Sunday, March 31, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: The Ridges
Meeting place: parking area along SR-682 between Ridges entrance and White’s Mill
Contact: David Tees (tees@ohio.edu; 594-6796)
 
Saturday, April 6, 9:00 a.m.
Work site: Rockhouse Trail (City of Athens preserve land)
Meeting place: Sells Park parking lot, at north end of Avon Place, Athens
Contacts: Lora Clapp (munsell@ohio.edu; 593-3675)
 
Saturday, April 6, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Baker conservation easement (Athens Conservancy)
Meeting place: parking area on west side of SR-690, 0.5 mile north of US-50, about 1 mile east of Dow Lake dam parking lot.
Contact: David Gedeon (dgedeon@sageofathens.com; 592-5166)
Note: It will be necessary to wade a small stream, which is usually ankle-deep but may be deeper following rainstorms; keep in mind when choosing footwear.
 
Sunday, April 7, 9:00 a.m.
Work site: Blue Ash Valley in Strouds Run State Park
Meeting place: parking lot behind Hampton Inn, next to University Mall
Contact: Tanner Filyaw (tanner@ruralaction.org; 330-466-5082)
 
Sunday, April 7, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Hockhocking-Adena Bikeway
Meeting place: the end of Armitage Road
Contact: Phil Cantino (pcantino@gmail.com; 594-3338)
 
Saturday, April 13, 9:00 a.m.
Work site: Strouds Run State Park, vicinity of Haley and Hank Trails
Meeting place: Horsemen’s parking area on Lake Hill Rd.*
Contact: David Tees (tees@ohio.edu; 594-6796)
 
Saturday, April 13, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Baker conservation easement (Athens Conservancy)
Meeting place: parking area on west side of SR-690, 0.5 mile north of US-50, about 1 mile east of Dow Lake dam parking lot.
Contact: Phil Cantino (pcantino@gmail.com; 594-3338)
Note: It will be necessary to wade a small stream, which is usually ankle-deep but may be deeper following rainstorms; keep in mind when choosing footwear.
 
Sunday, April 14, 9:00 a.m.
Work site: Blue Ash Valley in Strouds Run State Park
Meeting place: parking lot behind Hampton Inn, next to University Mall
Contact: Phil Cantino (pcantino@gmail.com; 594-3338)
 
Sunday, April 14, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: along Sundown Trail in the first valley east of Dow Lake dam
Meeting place: Dow Lake dam parking area, off US-50
Contact: Melanie Schori (schori@ohio.edu; 594-6796)
 
Saturday, April 20, 9:00 a.m.
Work site: Hockhocking-Adena Bikeway
Meeting place: the end of Armitage Road
Contact: Phil Cantino (pcantino@gmail.com; 594-3338)
 
Saturday, April 20, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Baker conservation easement (Athens Conservancy)
Meeting place: parking area on west side of SR-690, 0.5 mile north of US-50, about 1 mile east of Dow
Lake dam parking lot.
David Gedeon (dgedeon@sageofathens.com; 592-5166)
Note: It will be necessary to wade a small stream, which is usually ankle-deep but may be deeper following rainstorms; keep in mind when choosing footwear.
 
Sunday, April 21, 9:00 a.m.
Work site: Blue Ash Valley and Crumley Ridge in Strouds Run State Park
Meeting place: parking lot behind Hampton Inn, next to University Mall
Contact: Phil Cantino (cantino@ohio.edu; 594-3338)
 
Sunday, April 21, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Strouds Run State Park, vicinity of Haley and Hank Trails
Meeting place: Horsemen’s parking area on Lake Hill Rd.*
Contact: David Tees (tees@ohio.edu; 594-6796)
 
Saturday, April 27, 9:00 a.m.
Work site: Strouds Run State Park, vicinity of Haley and Hank Trails
Meeting place: Horsemen’s parking area on Lake Hill Rd.*
Contact: Melanie Schori (schori@ohio.edu; 594-6796)
 
Saturday, April 27, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Strouds Run State Park, vicinity of Haley and Hank Trails
Meeting place: Horsemen’s parking area on Lake Hill Rd.*
Contact: Phil Cantino (cantino@ohio.edu; 594-3338)
 
Sunday, April 28, 9:00 a.m.
Work site: Strouds Run State Park, vicinity of Haley and Hank Trails
Meeting place: Horsemen’s parking area on Lake Hill Rd.*
Contact: Tanner Filyaw (tanner@ruralaction.org; 330-466-5082)
 
Saturday, May 4, 1:00 p.m.
Work site: Blair Preserve (Athens Conservancy)
Meeting place: The first parking area on the right (south) side of Strouds Run Rd. as you enter the park coming from Athens
Contact: John Knouse (knousejohn@gmail.com; 502-608-2394)
 
Sunday, May 5, 1:00 p.m.
Blair Preserve (Athens Conservancy)
Meeting place: The first parking area on the right (south) side of Strouds Run Rd. as you enter the park coming from Athens
Contact: John Knouse (knousejohn@gmail.com; 502-608-2394)

 *The parking area for the Haley and Hank Trail work sessions is about a 20-minute drive from Athens. Go out Strouds Run Rd. and into the state park. At the main junction in the park, instead of turning left to the campground or right to the beach, continue straight on Strouds Run Rd. You will climb a steep, winding hill, with a junction at the top (Scatter Ridge Rd.). Stick to the right at this point (the name of the road you want to follow changes at this point to East Scatter Ridge Rd.). Soon you will pass Pete Smith Rd. coming in from the left. Continue on E. Scatter Ridge Rd. (more than a mile) until you see Lake Hill Rd. on your right. There is a sign there for horse trail access. Turn right on Lake Hill Rd., and the parking area is on the right a short way up the road. Although the route winds a lot, you will get there if you take the right fork at every junction after the steep climb.

Garlic-mustard, not a deli condiment

Garlic mustard flowersApril will soon be here, bringing the colors and fragrance of spring flowers, but also the unwelcome annual bloom of garlic mustard. While its name may sound like a spicy condiment, garlic mustard is actually one of Ohio’s worst invasive weeds.

Native to Europe and Asia, garlic mustard (Alliaria petiolata) was introduced into New York in the 1860s and spread rapidly. It is now abundant in the northeastern and central U.S., including Ohio. It tends to move in initially along rivers, roads and trails and then spread out from there. The seeds may be carried in bits of mud on people’s shoes, as well as by floodwaters and roadway mowing equipment.

Garlic mustard grows in a wide range of habitats but especially thrives in moist, shady woodlands, where it crowds out native wildflowers. Producing up to 800 seeds per plant, yielding as many as 1800 seedlings per square foot of ground, it quickly forms dense patches. Once it arrives, a diverse forest understory can quickly become a solid stand of garlic mustard. It has few natural enemies in North America; even the deer won’t eat it. Garlic mustard also contains chemicals that suppress the fungal partners (called mycorrhizae) that most plants—but not garlic mustard—depend on to help them absorb water and minerals from the soil. These chemicals even suppress everyone’s favorite spring mushroom, Morels.

 
Garlic mustard basal rosettesGarlic mustard is a biennial. It spends its first year as a low-growing rosette of yellowish-green, wrinkly-veiny leaves. The following spring, the stems rapidly lengthen and produce clusters of small, white, cross-shaped flowers. The flower clusters are initially flat-topped but become elongate as the shoot continues to grow. The flowers develop into narrowly cylindrical green fruits, which eventually turn brown and release their seeds, after which the plant dies. Garlic mustard is easily distinguished by its kidney-shaped to triangular, prominently veiny leaves with a garlicky odor when crushed.

 
Garlic mustard fruitIt is important to watch for garlic mustard and remove it as soon as it colonizes a site. Small patches can easily be pulled up by hand, and a weed-whip is helpful with larger infestations. However, this treatment must be repeated annually because the seeds may remain viable in the soil for five to ten years. Plants should ideally be pulled up or cut at ground level before or shortly after they start flowering. If the fruits have already started to form, then either the pulled plants should be bagged and removed or the fruits should be removed from each plant as it is pulled up. Fruits that are left attached to the plant sometimes continue development and release seeds even though the root is no longer in the ground. Larger populations may require the assistance of chemical herbicides.

Additional information about the ID and control of garlic mustard can be found in this OSU-E garlic mustard factsheet or watching this video by our partners in West Virginia.

 Additional questions can be answered by contacting Eric Boyda at appalachianohioweeds@gmail.com or 740-534-6578. Article written by Phil Cantino.