Category Archives: Invasive phenology updates

Phenology update: Garlic Mustard

100_3393Garlic mustard – Alliaria petiolata; Basal rosettes have normally grown enough to be easily spotted now.  The garlic mustard in this photo is particularly robust.  Also notice the Johnson grass in the background, and ground ivy in the front.

Invasive phenology updates: jimson weed, ground ivy, and kudzu

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Jimson Weed – Datura stramonium : flowering and fruiting (look at spiny egg shaped fruit in leaf axil.

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ground ivy – Glechoma hederacea – Dense infestation at disturbed forest edge and beginning to expand into the forest.

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Kudzu – Pueraria montana : growing over trees

Phenology updates: Deptford pink, Japanese barberry, garlic mustard, purple loosestrife, Queen Anne’s lace, mimosa, Chinese yam, and orange daylily

Hey AOWCP blog followers.  Uploading photos with updates of plant phenology has been one of my favorite things to post.  Unfortunately,  the main computer I am using doesn’t like loading pictures very well.  I will try harder to get to a different computer to keep loading pictures up.  Here are some highlights from the last month.

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Deptford pink – Dianthus armeria : flowering

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Japanese barberry – Berberis thunbergii : we used our weed wrench to pulled this guy up at a workshop

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Garlic mustard – Alliaria petiolata : here are some garlic mustard basal rosettes (intermixed with some japanese stiltgrass – Microstegium vimineum).

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Purple loosestrife – Lythrum salicaria : Blooming along the Ohio River.  Purple loosestrife blooms from early July to early September

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Queen Anne’s lace – Daucus carota: Queen Anne sure does own a lot of lace around here.  Here is some flowering (white flowers) intermixed with some dried curly dock (Rumex cripsus).

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Mimosa – Albizia julibrissin : Most have finished flowering by now, you may find a couple more still flowering the further north you are

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Chinese yam – Dioscorea opposita: agressively growing, should have tiny bulbils (think of a tiny potato aboveground) forming at axis.

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Orange daylilies – Hemerocallis fulva : Still flowering

Phenology updates: bush honeysuckle, Japanese stiltgrass, hairy jointgrass, hydrilla, orange daylily, and bohemian knotweed

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Bush honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.)– fruiting, green berrys

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Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) – has germinated and is anywhere from 1 to 6 inches tall.  This link might help ID it http://www.nps.gov/Plants/alien/fact/mivi1.htm

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Hairy jointgrass (Arthraxon hispidus) – germinated, around 1-4 inches tall.  Here is a link to help identify it http://www.ppws.vt.edu/scott/weed_id/arahi.htm

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Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) – has emerged
 
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Orange daylilies (Hemerocallis fulva) – flowerbuds forming

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Bohemian knotweed (Polygonum x bohemica) – Hybrid between japanese knotweed and giant knotweed.

Phenology updates: moneywort

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Moneywort (Lysimmchia nummularia) – flowering

Phenology Update: yellow sweetclover, chinese yam, burdock

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Yellow sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis)- flowering

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Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposita)- sprouting

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Common burdock (Arctium minus)- bolting

 

 

 

 

 

Phenology update: Japanese honeysuckle, multiflora rose, oxeye daisy, and crown vetch

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Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) – Flowering

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Multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora) – flowering

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Oxeye daisy (Leucanthemum vulgare)- flowering

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Crown vetch (Securigera varia)- flowering. Below is a good picture of crown vetch foliage mixed in with some oxeye daisy

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Phenology update: curly dock

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Curly dock (Rumex crispus) is flowering and fruiting.  You can tell it apart from Broadleaf dock (Rumex obtusifolius) by looking at the calyx on the fruit (wing on the seeds).  Curly dock (seen below) has smooth edges whereas broadleaf dock has small teeth on the calyx.  Follow this link to see pictures http://www.missouriplants.com/Greenalt/Rumex_obtusifolius_page.html

curley dock inflorescence

Distinguishing the Invasive paulownia from catalpa trees

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Catalpa

Our native catalpa tree (Catalpa speciosa, above) can be difficult to distinguish this time of year from the invasive royal princess tree (Paulownia tomentosa).  When you get closer though it is easy to distinguish.  The first characteristic is that catalpa has whorled leaves, that means that 3 leaves attach to the same portion of the stem.  See how above the leaves in various stages of maturation appear in groups of three?  The below picture is a close up off the stem.

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catalpa

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 See how Paulownia above has leaves that are growing in sets of two (opposite leaves).  Also note how much more hairy the leaves seem and their rougher edges.  Below is a close up of where the leaves attach to the stem, note that only two leaves attach at a node.

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If you break off a branch from the paulownia that is from last year (brown bark) you will also see the center is hollow

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Phenology updates: Mile-a-minute, Oriental bittersweet, Tree of heaven, Privet, and Ivy

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Mile-a-minute (Persicaria perfoliata) – [plant with triangular leaves] seedlings growing. Please note, AOWCP is still tracking populations of this species.  If you see any please report it to appalachianohioweeds@gmail.com

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Oriental bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus) – seedling (above), flower buds (below)

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Tree of Heaven (Ailanthus altissima) – leaf out

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Privets (Ligustrum spp.) – flower buds forming

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Ivy – (Hedera spp.) – Interesting set of photos demonstrating why it might not be a good idea to landscape with ivy.  This ivy happens to be growing behind the siding.  Second photo is almost 4 feet above the ground

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